How an Apple MacBook Air Kept the ‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’ Script Secret

Next time you look over at someone typing away on a computer at the coffee shop, you might be looking at someone creating the next big Star Wars script.

In a piece published in The Wall Street Journal on Thursday, Rian Johnson, the writer and director for last year’s blockbuster Star Wars: The Last Jedi, revealed that he wrote the entire film on Apple’s thin and lightweight notebook, the MacBook Air. But in a world overrun with security threats and people lusting after early access to a Star Wars script, Johnson needed to take some extreme measures to keep the script safe.

Johnshon explained in his Journal article that he kept the MacBook Air “air-gapped,” a term used to define a computer that never accesses the Internet. He also only used the MacBook Air for writing the script and when done, would turn it off and kept it hidden away in a safe at the studio.

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“I think my producer was constantly horrified I would leave it in a coffee shop,” he wrote.

Star Wars: The Last Jedi hit theaters to widespread fanfare in December. While the film has proven to be a blockbuster hit, it’s also been polarizing among Star Wars fans, with some loving the film’s direction and others taking issue with it. Still, with box office earnings in excess of $1 billion, the film has earned its place as one of the most popular Star Wars films ever.

And who knew the whole time it was just hiding on a MacBook Air?

Maria Dehn

Maria Dehn has held editorial management positions for numerous print and Web publications. She has more than 17 years of Information Technologies and journalism experience and has written many reports on cloud computing. You can reach her on Twitter @MariaDehn

Maria Dehn

Maria Dehn

Maria Dehn

Maria Dehn

Published by

Maria Dehn

Maria Dehn has held editorial management positions for numerous print and Web publications. She has more than 17 years of Information Technologies and journalism experience and has written many reports on cloud computing. You can reach her on Twitter @MariaDehn